Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

Veterinarian opening the mouth of a dog

Pet Diagnostic Imaging – Dental Radiology

Many tooth conditions can be missed without dental X- rays. High resolution digital dental radiographs show the tooth pulp, roots, crown and surrounding bone of each tooth with dramatic clarity. This information helps the veterinarian uncover hidden conditions such as tooth abscesses, cavities and fractures which can cause pain in your pet. Often the owner is not aware of the problem since most animals continue to eat.


 
 

Teeth with tartar and plaque and an x-ray image of teeth with arrows

Above left, tartar and plaque covers the base of the tooth and hides potential problems. Above right, on X-ray the arrows outline an area where we can clearly see that all of the jaw bone and associated gum line has receded from the root of the tooth leaving it exposed to disease and pain.

X-ray images of a fractured tooth with a root still intact and remodelled roots of a tooth

FIGURE 1 (left) and FIGURE 2 (right): In some patients the teeth can be so affected that the crown can actually break away leaving exposed roots (Figure 1 above). There is pain from the tooth disease, the fracture of the tooth, and then the exposed root fragment. There can be remodelling over time (Fig 2), as long as the infection is under control. Digital dental radiographs clearly identify these situations and are essential in helping to plan for the ideal treatment for your pet.

X-ray image with arrows pointing at root lesions in a cat

FIGURE 3: These are examples of typical root lesions found in cats. Note that these teeth appeared perfectly normal on physical exam. At our hospital we recommend full mouth dental radiographs for all cats because of this. Most pets that are over 6 years of age have some form of dental disease. It is instinctive for pets not to show pain; therefore a thorough examination is required.

Collage of digital x-ray images from a dog’s mouth

Take a look at this collage of digital images from a dog’s mouth and try and decide which teeth are abnormal.

Disease can affect each complex part of the tooth listed above, either alone or in combination. Without radiographs, we are only seeing and diagnosing disease in the enamel and partially the crown.

A dental radiograph and actual photograph of the same tooth after extraction

Compare the image on the left, a dental radiograph, with the image on the right, an actual photograph of the same tooth after extraction. Note that the tooth was cut in half to facilitate easier extraction. This is a great example of the fine detail that can be obtained with dental radiography. Take a look at the picture below:

A tooth intact in the mandible prior to extraction

It is a photograph of the same tooth, still intact in the mandible, prior to extraction. Note that visually, above the gum line, there are no abnormalities, and the tooth would otherwise appear to be vital. It is a great display of the importance of dental radiography, as left untreated, this was a very painful tooth.

Click here to view our dental radiography video banner

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Happy dog sitting in the middle of a road

Cases of Leptospirosis in the GTA

Westbridge Veterinary Hospital has received reports of leptospirosis cases from other veterinary hospitals in the GTA.

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Last updated: May 29, 2020

Dear Clients,

With recent changes to restrictions on businesses, we are pleased to advise that effective May 19, 2020 some restrictions on veterinary practices have been lifted. Based on these changes, below are some important updates to our operating policies.

1. WE CAN NOW SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. OPERATING HOURS

We are OPEN with the following hours:

- Monday to Friday: 10:00 am - 6:00 pm
- Saturday: 8:00 am - 1:00 pm
- Sunday: CLOSED


#. NEW PET OWNERS

Have you welcomed a new furry family member to your home? We’d love to meet them! Visit our Must Know New Pet Owner Information page for useful resources and helpful recommendations for new pet owners.

Thank you for your patience and understanding and we look forward to seeing you and your furry family members again!

Your dedicated team at Westbridge Veterinary Hospital